Romantic Art

Romantic Art

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Going Home by Tom Roberts

Going Home

“Going Home” was painted by Tom Roberts around 1889. It was part of the 9 by 5 impression exhibition at Buxton's Art Gallery in Melbourne.  At first glance the silhouetted forms of a couple walking together may not seem too romantic. The walk home could even be the couple's daily routine but sharing an umbrella with their arms linked together reveals an intimate relationship that could even be solidified by this simple gesture. 

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2

In The Springtime

“In The Springtime” was an 1896 oil painting by James Jebusa Shannon.  The man in the picture appears to be whispering to the lady.  She seems a bit reserved but she does not resist him.  Looking at the way he holds her right arm, one cannot miss the burning passion in his body language.

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In The Springtime by James Jebusa Shannon

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3
Dance at Bougival by Pierre Auguste Renoir

Dance at Bougival

“Dance at Bougival” was painted by Pierre-Auguste Renoir in 1883.  The dancing couple looks comfortable with each other and they don't seem too shy to show their affection.  We don't see the man's eyes but we can tell that he is totally smitten by the woman.

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4

Lamia

 
Inspired by the poem by John Keats, John William Waterhouse painted “Lamia” in 1905.  In the painting, Lamia is on her knees and her eyes are locked onto a soldier. Perhaps she is pleading to him not to leave. What seems to be a romantic scene could actually be a word of caution to young men who are easily enamored by beauty. Lamia is actually a daemon who seduces men in order to devour them.

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John William Waterhouse painted “Lamia” in 1905

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5

The End of the Ball

“The End of the Ball” is a 1915 painting by the Spanish artist Rogelio de Egusquiza. The painting depicts an elegantly dressed couple dancing a waltz.  The man seems to be relishing the moment while the woman affectionately leans against his shoulder.

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6

Tristan and Isolde

“Tristan and Isolde” was painted by Hugues Merle in 1870.  Tristan and Isolde was a popular 12th century legend about a love triangle between a knight named Tristan, his uncle King Mark and a princess named Isolde. Tristan was supposed to fetch the princess to marry his uncle, but they both unknowingly drank a love potion that made them fall for each other.  Here, we see them in an endearing scene while Isolde is distracted by a dog.  Some versions of the legend ends tragically while in some stories, they had children named after themselves.

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7

Spring

“Spring” (also known as “Spring time”) was painted by Pierre Auguste Cot and it was exhibited at the Salon in 1873.  Shown here are two young lovers playing on a swing.  One can't help but notice their youth and their flirtatious looks.  Although the image was painted over a hundred years ago, it continues to inspire.

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8

Romeo and Juliet on the Balcony

“Romeo and Juliet on the Balcony” is an 1886 painting by the Swedish artist Julius Kronberg.  The position of the couple in this picture reveals their excitement for each other.  Romeo just emerged from his climb with his other foot is still hanging out of the balcony.  He immediately kisses Juliet who reclines to receive his affectionate gesture.

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james
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9

The Tryst

“The Tryst” is a pair of paintings by Jean-Leon Gerome completed around 1840.  The first painting shows a male sitting on top of a tall camel, reaching to kiss a woman behind a window.  The other shows the same woman standing on the back of another woman to reach the window.  The Orientalist painting suggests that there's forbidden love in any culture and like any culture, the lovers find many ways to defy the restrictions.

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10

The Meeting on the Turret Stairs

Inspired by an old Danish ballad, “The Meeting on the Turret Stairs” was painted by Frederick William Burton in 1864.  The painting depicts the ill-fated love between Princess Hellelil and her guard Hildebrand.  Hillelil's father found Hildebrand unsuitable for her so he ordered his sons to kill him.  The watercolour painting shows Hildebrand passionately embracing Hillelil's arm on the turret stairs. 

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