Corporate Art

Corporate Art

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Wall Street

“Wall Street”, also known as “Broadway from the Post Office”, was painted by Colin Campbell Cooper circa 1909.  Colin Campbell Cooper was a well-known figure in American Impressionism.  He was mostly known for his architectural paintings, particularly of skyscrapers in New York City.  This particular painting depicts Wall Street and its crowd during the early 1900s. It is now part of the collection of the City of Santa Barbara.

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2

Portrait of the Merchant Georg Gisze by Hans Holbein the Younger (1532)

“Portrait of the Merchant Georg Gisze” was by painted by Hans Holbein the Younger in 1532. The portrait depicts Georg Gisze, a German merchant, opening a letter from his brother. On the table, we see a vase of carnations, pen, scissors, money, inkpots, boxes and keys. The painting was once a part of the collection of the Duke of Orleans in 1727. This artwork is now located at Gemäldegalerie, Berlin.

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james
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3
St Martin-in-the-Fields 1888 by William Logsdail

St. Martin in the Fields by William Logsdail (1888)

“St. Martin in the Fields” was painted by English artist William Logsdail in 1888.  Longsdail is mostly known for his “plein air” paintings similar to St. Martin in the Fields. The painting depicts a child selling flowers Trafalgar Square with St. Martin in the Fields in the background. The painting is now part of the Tate gallery.

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james
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4

The Banker And His Wife by Quentin Metsys (1514)

“The Banker And His Wife” was painted by Quentin Metsys in 1514. Most of his works provide commentaries about human feelings and society in general. In this painting, a man is busy weighing coins on the table while his wife is distracted from reading a book of devotion. This painting is now at the Louvre in Paris.

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james
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5

A Cotton Office in New Orleans by Edgar Degas (1873)

“A Cotton Office in New Orleans” was an 1873 painting about a cotton brokerage business by Edgar Degas. The painting shows his uncle, Michel Musson, inspecting the quality of the cotton while his brother Rene is reading a newspaper. The painting was the first of his to be purchased by a museum. It was bought by the Musée des beaux-arts de Pau.

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james
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6

The Banker's Private Room Negotiating a Loan

“The Banker's Private Room Negotiating a Loan” was painted by John Callcott Horsley in 1870. John Callcott Horsley was known for designing the first Christmas card. He is also known for his illustrations and paintings of genre and historical scenes. This particular painting depicts a woman showing a document to a man who appears to be contemplating the transaction. It is now a part of a collection of Royal Holloway, University of London.

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james
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7

The Money Counter by Pompeo Massani (1865)

“The Money Counter” was painted by Italian painter Pompeo Massani in 1867. His paintings often depict inebriated elderly individuals. The Money Counter shows an old woman holding coins while the man appears to be greedily reaching to take a closer look.

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james
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8

Going to Business by Jacques Joseph Tissot

“Going to Business” by French painter Jacques Joseph Tissot. While he was known for painting fashionably dressed women and scenes from the Bible, he also painted social life in Paris. “Going to Business” shows a businessman – presumably of some importance - in a horse drawn carriage reading a newspaper, perhaps on his way to work.

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james
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9
Portraits at the Stock Exchange

Portraits at the Stock Exchange by Edgar Degas (1878-1879)

“Portraits at the Stock Exchange” was painted by Edgar Degas in 1878-79.  It shows Ernest May, a banker, conducting business at the stock exchange in Paris.  The subject was a known collector and admirer of Degas' works.  The painting is now at the Musée d'Orsay in Paris.

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james
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10

The Iron-Rolling Mill (Eisenwalzwerk) by Adolph Menzel (1875)

“The Iron-Rolling Mill” by Adolph Menzel. Menzel is considered to be one of the most prominent German artists of the 19th century. The painting depicts men working at the steel mill in various stages of their work day. The most striking part of the image shows men working with molten metal. The painting was subtitled "Modern Cyclops" as an allusion to the Cyclopes, the blacksmiths in Greek and Roman mythology. Some find the dark and dangerous scene to be glimpse of a peculiar industrial version of hell. This work is now at the Alte Nationalgalerie in Berlin.

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The Iron Rolling Mill Eisenwalzwerk

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james
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